PAX East 2014

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Kingston HyperX

11 April 2014 | Written by Maxxum, with contributions by Ally

Full disclosure, I've only ever bought one USB thumb drive in my life, a 128MB Kingston DataTraveler purchased over 10 years ago. Since then, every other drive I've acquired has been in the form of press kits handed to me during coverage of events. As I was preparing for PAX East 2014, I came across the skeletal remains of my first drive. The outer shell had fallen apart sometime in 2007 and despite several moves, and no attempt at static shielding, the drive still worked.

Aware that Kingston would be at PAX, I brought the drive with me to compare old tech with Kingston's new hardware being presented at the event. I met with David Leong, Public Relations Manager for Kingston's HyperX.

Going back to the 128MB drive, I was curious to see how 10 years of advancements had aided Kingston's modern tech. I benchmarked both drives along the following parameters:

AMD-A10-5757M laptop running Windows 8.1
CyrstalDiskmark 3.0.3a 8x @ 50MB ReadyBoost Disabled
Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 64GB USB 3.0 @ USB 2.0 NTFS
Kingston DataTraveler 128MB USB 2.0 @ USB 2.0 NTFS

Note that both drives were limited to a 50MB file size for this portion of the test because the original DataTraveler's formatted size is 92MB.

Kingston DataTraveler 128MB Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 64GB USB 3.0 @ USB 2.0

Compared to the Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 64GB USB 3.0 drive there were no surprises, the HyperX drive is significantly faster. Running at its native USB 3.0 spec, the HyperX drive recorded the following results:

AMD-A10-5757M laptop running Windows 8.1
Test #1 CyrstalDiskmark 3.0.3a 8x @ 100MB ReadyBoost Disabled
Test #2 CyrstalDiskmark 3.0.3a 8x @ 1000MB ReadyBoost Disabled
Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 64GB USB 3.0 @ USB 3.0 NTFS

Test #1 CyrstalDiskmark 3.0.3a 8x @ 100MB ReadyBoost Disabled Test #2 CyrstalDiskmark 3.0.3a 8x @ 1000MB ReadyBoost Disabled

These results are similar to those recorded by other sites, and faster than Kingston's quoted speeds of 225/135 when transferring large files. Other distinguishing features about the HyperX 64GB drive are an attractive blue aluminum casing with rubber appointments, and a hole for attaching a lanyard. It is available in 64GB, 128GB, and 256GB sizes and supports ReadyBoost. All drives come with a 5 year warranty. It will be interesting to see if this drive will last as long as the 128MB DataTraveler. We'll let you know at PAX East 2024.

Click here for more information about the Kingston HyperX line of USB thumb drives.

End of line.

Photos by Maxxum