Coverage

Terms of Service:

Photos and videos may not be reposted or broadcast without the expressed written permission or license from Washington Mnemonic, and must attribute washington-mnemonic.com as the source.


mail
Validate XHTML 1.0 Strict
and Css

 

Wargaming.net & Master of Orion

19 July 2015 | Written by Maxxum

Wargaming.net threw us a curve-ball when they announced that they are working on a new 'Master of Orion'. I intentionally avoided reading about Wargaming.net's news releases so that I could hear it directly during our meeting. Our team had expected a new WWII themed release, not an update to the classic galactic empire building series. Wargaming.net was awarded the rights to MoO during a 24 July 2013 auction that was held as part of Atari's bankruptcy filing, and while it's not unexpected that a new MoO was coming, we didn't expected it to happen so quickly.

Character from the upcoming Master of Orion

Our hosts revealed that Victor Kislyi, the CEO of Wargaming.net, had been a long-time fan of the series. Limited details of the game were available - however, our demo did provide us with a view of the updated graphics, some interaction (friendly and hostile) between species, and a semi-annoying (but mostly amusing) bird-man-freak-alien thing whose role in the game is to aid the player. Our initial observation is that the game is straddling the line between adult and youth gamers; the bird-freak guide bares similarities to Jar-Jar Binks, however the complexity of game play that requires political savvy, and intergalactic commerce skills is clearly meant more mature players.

Wargaming.net advised that the game is still in alpha, so essentially anything can still be changed, although I expect the graphics and art to remain the same as it strikes the right balance of 80's/90's nostalgia with a modern renderer. One interesting detail of the game is that planets are randomly generated, including planetary elements, materials, and states - for the player it means that each planet will be unique, it also means that planets will be habitable for some races, but not others; there's no way to tell until one explores. Moreover, cinematic are rendered based on the state of the planet so each planet landing is particular to that event. Additionally, if the planet was pristine the first time one visits, then nuked from orbit later in the game, it will reflect that damage when one returns to maintain a sense of realism.

Aside from the MoO reveal, Wargaming.net also shared updates regarding the World of Warships, which is still in beta and has developed more so since we last saw it. Graphics models are showing more detail, and when ships are destroyed, you get to watch them slowly sink. Wargaming.net likes to provide graphics to show all the cool stuff they do, and typically we post the ones that are specific to the article, but the media assets they gave us this E3 have a lot of very impressive artwork and screen grabs this time around, so we're sharing all of them:

Artwork

World of Tanks Screen Grabs

World of Tanks Xbox Screen Grabs

World of Warships Screen Grabs

Photos by Maxxum, Wargaming.net